Huxley

14/8/16 10:54
benicek: (Default)
[personal profile] benicek
I have set about reading some of the untouched second hand books I've been hoarding for years. One was a collection of essays called 'Along the Road' by Aldous Huxley, published in 1925. I had forgotten how amusing Huxley could be.

This is him writing about Italian renaissance church architecture: 

"The psychoanalysts, who trace all interest in art back to an infantile love of excrement, would doubtless offer some simple faecal explanation for the varieties in our aesthetic passions. One man loves masses, another lines: the explanation in terms of coprophily is so obvious that I may be excused from giving it here." 

And how prescient is this for 1925? Huxley 
guessing at what future people might do if they had increased wealth and leisure time:

"there would be an enormous increase in the demand for such time-killers and substitutes for thought as newspapers, films, cheap means of communication and wireless telephones"

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(no subject)

15/8/16 10:24 (UTC)
sallymn: from a Chalet School book cover (books 2)
Posted by [personal profile] sallymn
Oooh, this sounds like my sort of book :)

(no subject)

14/8/16 12:52 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] wantedonvoyage.livejournal.com
Sarcastic sumbitch isn't he? But his prediction was pretty good. Although these days reading a newspaper sounds downright intellectual for most people.

(no subject)

14/8/16 14:32 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] benicek.livejournal.com
Not if it is the Daily Express or Sun.

(no subject)

14/8/16 15:37 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] wantedonvoyage.livejournal.com
Okay, weird. I never heard of this dude and then--not an hour after reading your post--this is on my FB feed:

huxley.jpg

(no subject)

14/8/16 15:51 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] benicek.livejournal.com
You must have heard of 'Brave New World' or 'Doors of Perception'.

(no subject)

14/8/16 15:53 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] wantedonvoyage.livejournal.com
Brave New World yes, but did not know the author's name. And it was just spooky seeing it twice so quickly.

(no subject)

14/8/16 16:05 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] benicek.livejournal.com
'Tis an omen!

(no subject)

14/8/16 15:39 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] homunculus.livejournal.com
i agree, pretty cool.

i've recently started to read the handful of christie's poirot novels i picked up at a used bookstore months ago. lol i like them.

(no subject)

14/8/16 15:52 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] benicek.livejournal.com
I've never approached classic English crime fiction. I should give it a go and find out for myself just why it was so successful.

(no subject)

14/8/16 18:42 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] homunculus.livejournal.com
i hadn't yet, either, but rick and i recently watched the entire show on netflix, and i wanted to read the books the episodes were based on. i'm finding they changed a lot, ofc, but both incarnations are still great.

(no subject)

14/8/16 16:43 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] honeymink.livejournal.com
The last thing I read by Huxley was "Island" and 90% of it felt incredibly schoolmasterly and contrived to me. I did like "Brave New World" though.

(no subject)

14/8/16 17:09 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] benicek.livejournal.com
I loved Island; maybe for exactly the reasons you didn't. I liked having such an idyllic place explained. It doesn't have much of a story though.

(no subject)

14/8/16 17:17 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] honeymink.livejournal.com
Well, it'd be a miracle if we all liked the same things.

I liked having such an idyllic place explained.

That's one reason I read it. After quite a few dystopian novels, I really wanted to have an utopian vision explained. But I suppose I wasn't quite convinced by 'The Yoga of Love'.